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Antique Rug Dealer

 
07-07-2011  |  By: Azaad |  (0) Post comment »  |  Read comments »
 
Antique Rug Dealer


The antique rug industry is a world in which rich history, function, and style collide. Trying to figure out fair pricing and good quality in that mix of goals can be tricky. Age is not necessarily the sole indicator of what you should be paying, as much as we'd like to think "oh, the older, the better!" For example, the nineteenth century actually produced Persian rugs that are almost priceless, while many older works were not of such high quality. The material used is also not always a straight indicator- a wool isn't always inferior to a silk. It is a combination of materials, craftsmanship, style, and design methods that contribute to that aspect of price determination.

And of course, individual aesethics and simple supply and demand also alter the prices. Therefore, rarity and current trends will also cause prices to fluctuate over time, sometimes almost nonsensically. What might be all the rage this year (thanks, perhaps to a celebrity endorsment) might be pass by next season.

 Antique rugs are odd in that they are a functional piece of furniture, art, and a financial investment all rolled into one. It requires an experienced, smart, and resourcesful rug dealer to get the prices his wares deserve, and find the right pieces for customers at reasonable prices.
 

Fourth of July Rugs

 
07-04-2011  |  By: ESP |  (0) Post comment »  |  Read comments »
 
Fourth of July Rugs
Although it may seem like an antique rug store would have very little to do with the Fourth of July, in fact there are lots of connections between the two. Of course, when we think of the Fourth of July, we think of Indpendence day, and the celebration of the United States of America, the American way. Lots of ice cold beer, lemonade icees, and iced tea. Hot corn on the cob with butter and salt, juicy burgers with hot sauce and mustard, cookie and ice cream sandwiches. Snow cones, cotton candy, blue grass music, country music, rock music, dancing, laughing. Warm weather, fireflies, hugs, sticky fingers, grass and grass stains. Red white and blue themed outfits, bathing suits, floaties. Bubbles, smiles, teeth stained blue from popsicles. Moon bounces, trampolines, water balloon tosses and fights and battles. Hula hoops, volleyballs, games of ninja.

It's all around a good time: a joyous occasion, marked with fireworks.

What we don't think of are rugs made in far off lands at far off times. But there actually are a few connections between the two concepts. Well, not that many, but at least a few:
First of all, the free trade of the Middle East during an era when most other routes and especially European ones were controlled tightly helped allow for the flourishing of this art. It's a tenuous connection, but one might say that such freedoms set a precedent for other cultures, and in a roundabout way, set a precedent for the founders of our own country.

A more direct connection is color themed: many Persian rugs, although not having anything to do with the United States directly, feature red, white, and blue themes and may be quite appropriate as decorations.

The fact of the matter is, one of the main issues connecting Persian rugs and
 

Antique Rugs in Hallways

 
06-28-2011  |  By: ESP |  (0) Post comment »  |  Read comments »
 
Antique Rugs in Hallways
If your homes is blessed
 

Antique Rugs from Uzbekistan

 
06-22-2011  |  By: ESP |  (0) Post comment »  |  Read comments »
 
Antique Rugs from Uzbekistan

Although it may seem like Persia (Iran) has always had a monopoly on oriental and antique rugs, carpets and rugs have actually been created for centuries and centuries in what was known as "Turkestan", which is now Uzbekistan and Turkmenistan. The ancient, busy 'silk road' that stretched between Baghdad and Tehran, Samarkand, and Tashkent went right through the area, and therefore centuries of traders hauling goods between China and the West went through these rugged areas.  

The landscape was very often quite bleak, barren and arid, with a few windswept trees and lots of rocks. The population has always and will likely always be low, and the area has a history of nomadism. The area also has a tradition of self-sufficiency, and making the most of very limited resources: they used every part of every animal and plant they had, to make themselves clothes, shelters, and gear that was reuired to keep moving about. And among these items were vey rich, very distinctive wool rugs.

Most of the antique rugs from this area are extremely hardy, with very thick cloth and simple, bold shapes and lines. They were not only designed for beauty, back in the day, but also for function: they helped to keep the nomad's homes warm during the freezing winters. They retained a lot of heat from the fire when placed on the floor, so that the ground wouldn't sap the heat from a standing person's feet, or from bodies as they lay sleeping. They also served as thick cushioning for bedrolls, adding an extra layer of softness between sleepers and the ground.

Pretty much all of the rugs from this area were traded through Iran, Pakistan, or sometimes Afghanistan. Many of the Turkoman rugs were then mistaken for true-born Persian rugs, and its is very possible that many of the what we call Persian rugs were actually woven by these nomads on the steppes. 
 

Persian Rugs in the Workplace

 
06-20-2011  |  By: Azaad |  (0) Post comment »  |  Read comments »
 
Persian Rugs in the Workplace
When you think of buying a really nice antique rug, you definitely think of it for your living room, taking up the hardwood floor proudly. Or maybe for your dining room, if you don't have children, decorating the space beneath your table. Some people even imagine they'll mount an antique rug to the wall of their living room and display it like a priceless work of art.
But there's another option: rugs not for the home at all, but for the office.
If you think about it, you spend nearly as much time in your office as you do at home (especially if you are one of those people that works a steady nine to five job with no home time. Why shouldn't you and your employees (or employers, depending on where you are on the branch) enjoy that personal space as if it were a home?
I was in a kind of small but well constructed place of business the other day, and it had these lovely, arching windows that let the late afternoon sunlight dapple in through the trees and play across the tree-patterned green and silver Persian rugs taht they had lining hte hardwood floor. The carpets really suited the space and made it feel so much homier and more lovely. It immediately put clients at ease, even if they were not consciously aware that their good mood was in part generated by carefully crafted working spaces. It kept all of the employees in good spirits, able to deal with the stresses of the day.
Even just a very simple change such as this one can go a long way. You might want to consider buying a rug for your office, or persuading your boss to do so. Productivity may rise around the office, and happiness and quality of life certainly will.
 

Stain Removal on Antique Rugs

 
06-17-2011  |  By: Azaad |  (0) Post comment »  |  Read comments »
 
Stain Removal on Antique Rugs
It happens. Maybe you have a toddler who likes to run around with crackers in her had, and then proceeds to drop them and smash them into carpets. Maybe you like wine, and accidentally knock over a glass of it. Maybe your dog ate something strange in the garden and decided to re-girft it to you on your antique rug. Or maybe you have a very inconsiderate teenager living in the house who thinks nothing of tracking mud into the house and all over the carpeting.
If these or other accidents and spills happen over your nice antique rug, there are a few home-remedies you can try before having to hire a carpet cleaner.
First of all, you obviously have to remove any excess materials: sop up liquids with paper towels, pick up crumbs with bits of tape (scotch only), pick up clods of dirt, whatever it takes. Then soak a rag in water and place it over the stain to absorb excess material. THen you can try stain or spot removal liquids. These are often made for clothes but can also work on carpets. They also make specialty product for precisely this purpose.
If you don't want to use harsh chemicals in your home for whatever reason, you can use white (clear) vinegar and club soda, whose acidity will help break down the stain. But of course, these materials depend on what kind of material your rug is made out of: cotton and wool will react differently. You should either call the company you bought it from or do a little rug-specific research on the internet to make sure you won't compromise the integrity of the colors or threads of your antique rug.
But don't despair! An accident doesn't mean you have to have an unsightly stain forever. There are definitely actions you can take to mitigate the effects.
 

Persian Rug Study

 
06-16-2011  |  By: ESP |  (0) Post comment »  |  Read comments »
 
Persian Rug Study
Most students do not even notice them. They continue about their merry day, dashing to class, carrying heavy books from the library, cramming in study rooms. Maybe they look up, and notice the highly intricate scroll work on the ceiling, or the finely crafted mantle place over the fireplace that nobody's allowed to notice anymore. Maybe they spend their whole day outside, tossing around a frisbee and sipping iced tea.

But they are there. In rich ornate side rooms in Sterling library, they are there. In grand hallways leading to even grander rooms: they're there. In masters' houses, in the president's house, even in some classrooms (more like lecture halls, if you really take the time to stop and think about it): they are there.
Persian rugs, antique rugs, older than many students parents and then some. They accumulate dust and the dirt of thousands of geet over the years, but they still tell a story. A story of the aesthetic of the time, of the choices architects and designers make, of what people consider to be luxury.

Apparently, for even a castle-like school with soaring stained glass and spindling roofs and booming bell towers, a rug can make all the difference between mediocrity and luxury. Many newer schools just don't have rooms that would look right with a Persian rug. Many schols think they can't get one because they aren't old enough.

They're wrong. A rug like that can look great in almost any room. But it's true: there's something about the grandiosity of old New England private universities, the decadence of all that money, that goes particularly well with the beauty and pomp and circumstance of a very old, very expensive bit of carpeting. Maybe they're deluding themselves, trying to grasp a small part of bygone days whose remnants haunt the campus. Or maybe, they just have good taste: Persian rugs look good everywhere.
 

Persian Rug Choices

 
06-15-2011  |  By: Azaad |  (0) Post comment »  |  Read comments »
 
Persian Rug Choices
Buying a beautiful patterned antique rug for your living room, bedroom, or dining room (or all three!) can be a monumental sequence of decisions. First of all, you have to decide on what size of rug to buy: this obviously depends on the dimensions of the room you plan to house it in, and the aesthetic you're going for: a small Persian rug says something very different than a huge one that takes up the whole room
The second decision you have to come to is about color palette: some rooms look best with a dark maroon and gold look, some do much better with a rich green or navy blue or a deep, royal purple. And within these, there are permutations: green and black is so different from a green paired with a creamy white, or green and silver, or green and red.
One of the next decisions is what kind of texture you want your rug to have: there are different materials used all over the world, from wool to silk to cotton and different blends thereof. Also, threat count is super important for determining the kind of texture. If you have small children, they'll be delighted with a fine, soft cotton blend. If you want something hartier, you might want to go for more of a wool or something like that.
And last but not least, you really need to decide on the patterns you want. Many rugs are made in the Muslim tradition and sport only geometric shapes, but many others have images of plants, animals, and other critters scrolling across them. You can have a cool hunting sequence represented, or a serene forest. Or just a highly intricate pattern of swirls and circles.
There is a whole spectrum of choices to be made when choosing yourself a new rug: make sure you choose whats best for you and your family.
 

Persian Rug Representations of Forests

 
06-05-2011  |  By: Azaad |  (0) Post comment »  |  Read comments »
 
This is how weavers use Persian rugs to represent beautiful forests and landscapes.
 

Persian Rug Sunset

 
06-01-2011  |  By: Azaad |  (0) Post comment »  |  Read comments »
 
Persian Rug Sunset
I love my family. I love basketball and writing and drawing. I'm a happy person. Not that many people are, I've found.
I love people, and brains, and trying to figure out how people's brains make them do the things they do. Tracing the human ability of Theory of Mind to the left temporoparietal junction is like finding the tributaries of a river filled with gold flecks.
I love words. I love the unconscious effects words have on our brains, and trying to figure out how to exploit that to pack an emotional punch.
I am of the opinion that it is the writer's job to make the reader feel terrible. Angry, unbearably excited, bereaved, tense, lost,  and furious, furious, furious.  If your reader doesn't feel like crap, you're doing something wrong. People who make antique rugs also have this power.
My dad is a storyteller, through Persian rugs. He and I are similar in three important ways: we both like getting up early, we both like fantastical stories where things explode, and we broth write with colored uniball pens that leak all the time.
I have a hard time with unhappiness, in that I don't understand it. Everything I know about it I've learned from fiction. TV, mainly. Whenever Im unhappy, I feel like a very brief visitor to the land of the sad people. Not a native.
Im all about heroes being unhappy, though. They need to be internally, subdermally conflicted. Im not interested in Jesus or Superman or even Neo because they dont have that inner awful that makes Batman so great.
Im open about everything. If I share too much, Im sorry, but sex and embarrassing stories dont make me blush. Well they do but I carry on anyway. For example: Im in love with a guy whos been with his girlfriend for six years. I sleep around, and thats fun, but seriously. I hope one day to meet someone who cn smash him out of this universe. (Also: Super Smash Brothers is the greatest videogame created by mankind end of story.)
 

Old Rug Interviews

 
05-29-2011  |  By: ESP |  (0) Post comment »  |  Read comments »
 
 

Moms answers first, dad's second.

1.    What did you want to become when you were twelve?
I wanted to be an actress.

An astronaut! Or a rug maker. For some reason I was obsessed with old rugs.

2. Are you happy with the way your life turned out?
Yes. Because I am raising three very special children. I regret that I didnt find part-time work that went well with my parenting.

In most respects, yes. Im happy with my wonderful family, my house and cars and pets. Sometimes I wonder if I chose the right profession. I could have done anything. Its hard to choose on thing. I dont know if I chose the right thing but(Hes a screenplay writer)

4. Who was your last boyfriend/ girlfriend before Daddy/Mommy?
Jay Razumny. He was an actor. We broke up after we took a trip together and I found him very difficult. I said Im not going out with you anymore. Its over

Lisas sister, Ruth. Aaronson.  (He nodded off for a few minutes at this point, and I have no idea who any of those people are)

5. Whats the most terrifying thing youve ever done?
Trying to bungee jump in South Padre island. I just could not step of the platform. I cried all of the way down the elevator. It was also a very humiliating experience. But then I went with you on the vomit comet! That was terrifying and fun!
Going on that ride, the vomit comet, or shooting star or something. I went with Katy, in south Padre Island. I was talked into it before I knew what I was getting into.

6. How do you feel about your parents?
My mother and I have been like friends. We have a lot in common in our personalities. When I was a teenager, she was less of a mom and more of a friend. My dad had a very short temper when I was growing up. Hes mellowed in his old age though. He and I arent as close as my mom and me.

I love my parents. They were very good parents. Especially my mom.

7. What is your favorite thing to do without your family?
I love to go out and karaoke. But I havent done it recently.

Favorite thing to do? Without the family.  When I went on a white water rafting trip on the Colorado River. With Bill Oreilly and Lou Spoto. And that one guy, who DID turn out to be a Persian rug salesman.

8. Whats the worst thing Mom/Dads ever done? (Or what s/he does the most that annoys you)
When he gets oblivious. He doesnt really hear what youre saying. We call him Captain Oblivio.

When she stays out till two AM singing karaoke. On weeknights!  

9. Whats the worst injury youve ever had? What happened?
When my brother pushed me off the skateboard when I was ten. I broke my arm. Or maybe... When I had a hernia when I was pregnant. I had to have surgery when I was four months pregnant.

I got the wind knocked out of me in football practice. Oh wait this wasnt really an injury: once I got a terrible toothache in my wisdom tooth. It was horrendous. I had to have it pulled that day. I was thirty-eight.

10. What (in your opinion) are your best talents?
Usually Im very good working with people. Organization.  I can act well.

Writing, obviously. Verbal expression. Good vocabulary. Knowing stuff about sports. (He nods off at this point)

11. Whats the worst part of your personality?
That I go through depressions from time to time.

There are no bad parts! I spose people would say my absent mindedness. My tendency to get lost in the ozone.  (Even he knows hes captain oblivio!)

12. Whats your pet peeve?
Children who wont get out of bed in the morning! (At me) Waste of food, or energy or water waste.

I have lots. I cant believe I am not thinking of any at this moment. Software that doesnt work properly.
(Especially with hardware.) Buggy software!!! I hate software that doesnt work!  



13. How do you feel about Bush?
Bush handled the 9-11 pretty well. I dont agree with his domestic policies. Hes totally weakened our environmental laws. His decision to lower taxes took money away from social needs. It wasnt worth a few dollars to sacrifice. (Trails off)

I think hes a good man whos trying to do his job as well as he can. Sometimes he finds the job overwhelming.


14. What was your favorite childhood pet?
I couldnt have pets with fur. My dad was allergic. So my favorite pet was a boa constrictor. His name was Lucifer. I used to have him around my neck. People would say, Is that real? and Id say, No, it runs on batteries. It was pretty funny.

Tomasina the cat. She moved from Minnesota to Texas with us. Then she caught some disease and died.

15. Whats your most vivid memory?
Right now its coming out of the church after getting married and having the rice thrown on us, and how happy I was.

Getting married.   Or maybe That time I was in the auto accident when I was a kid. My dad was almost killed. A guy got killed in that accident.




















 

Old Rug Interviews

 
05-28-2011  |  By: ESP |  (0) Post comment »  |  Read comments »
 
Old Rug Interviews
 

Moms answers first, dad's second.

1.    What did you want to become when you were twelve?
I wanted to be an actress.

An astronaut! Or a rug maker. For some reason I was obsessed with old rugs.

2. Are you happy with the way your life turned out?
Yes. Because I am raising three very special children. I regret that I didnt find part-time work that went well with my parenting.

In most respects, yes. Im happy with my wonderful family, my house and cars and pets. Sometimes I wonder if I chose the right profession. I could have done anything. Its hard to choose on thing. I dont know if I chose the right thing but(Hes a screenplay writer)

4. Who was your last boyfriend/ girlfriend before Daddy/Mommy?
Jay Razumny. He was an actor. We broke up after we took a trip together and I found him very difficult. I said Im not going out with you anymore. Its over

Lisas sister, Ruth. Aaronson.  (He nodded off for a few minutes at this point, and I have no idea who any of those people are)

5. Whats the most terrifying thing youve ever done?
Trying to bungee jump in South Padre island. I just could not step of the platform. I cried all of the way down the elevator. It was also a very humiliating experience. But then I went with you on the vomit comet! That was terrifying and fun!
Going on that ride, the vomit comet, or shooting star or something. I went with Katy, in south Padre Island. I was talked into it before I knew what I was getting into.

6. How do you feel about your parents?
My mother and I have been like friends. We have a lot in common in our personalities. When I was a teenager, she was less of a mom and more of a friend. My dad had a very short temper when I was growing up. Hes mellowed in his old age though. He and I arent as close as my mom and me.

I love my parents. They were very good parents. Especially my mom.

7. What is your favorite thing to do without your family?
I love to go out and karaoke. But I havent done it recently.

Favorite thing to do? Without the family.  When I went on a white water rafting trip on the Colorado River. With Bill Oreilly and Lou Spoto. And that one guy, who DID turn out to be a Persian rug salesman.

8. Whats the worst thing Mom/Dads ever done? (Or what s/he does the most that annoys you)
When he gets oblivious. He doesnt really hear what youre saying. We call him Captain Oblivio.

When she stays out till two AM singing karaoke. On weeknights!  

9. Whats the worst injury youve ever had? What happened?
When my brother pushed me off the skateboard when I was ten. I broke my arm. Or maybe... When I had a hernia when I was pregnant. I had to have surgery when I was four months pregnant.

I got the wind knocked out of me in football practice. Oh wait this wasnt really an injury: once I got a terrible toothache in my wisdom tooth. It was horrendous. I had to have it pulled that day. I was thirty-eight.

10. What (in your opinion) are your best talents?
Usually Im very good working with people. Organization.  I can act well.

Writing, obviously. Verbal expression. Good vocabulary. Knowing stuff about sports. (He nods off at this point)

11. Whats the worst part of your personality?
That I go through depressions from time to time.

There are no bad parts! I spose people would say my absent mindedness. My tendency to get lost in the ozone.  (Even he knows hes captain oblivio!)

12. Whats your pet peeve?
Children who wont get out of bed in the morning! (At me) Waste of food, or energy or water waste.

I have lots. I cant believe I am not thinking of any at this moment. Software that doesnt work properly.
(Especially with hardware.) Buggy software!!! I hate software that doesnt work!  



13. How do you feel about Bush?
Bush handled the 9-11 pretty well. I dont agree with his domestic policies. Hes totally weakened our environmental laws. His decision to lower taxes took money away from social needs. It wasnt worth a few dollars to sacrifice. (Trails off)

I think hes a good man whos trying to do his job as well as he can. Sometimes he finds the job overwhelming.


14. What was your favorite childhood pet?
I couldnt have pets with fur. My dad was allergic. So my favorite pet was a boa constrictor. His name was Lucifer. I used to have him around my neck. People would say, Is that real? and Id say, No, it runs on batteries. It was pretty funny.

Tomasina the cat. She moved from Minnesota to Texas with us. Then she caught some disease and died.

15. Whats your most vivid memory?
Right now its coming out of the church after getting married and having the rice thrown on us, and how happy I was.

Getting married.   Or maybe That time I was in the auto accident when I was a kid. My dad was almost killed. A guy got killed in that accident.





















 

Persian Rug Dreams

 
05-24-2011  |  By: ESP  |  (0) Post comment »  |  Read comments »
 
   
    A screaming comes across the sky, West says, tilting back in the co-pilots chair non-chalantly. (Though hed had solder the metal chair to make it do that.)
        I know, Corker whispers, feet up on the Zeesters console and mashing buttons on an old GameSphere. His piloting station is weirdly decorated with tribal rugs and pots. Truly, truly spooky.
         Sander, you dont get it. Wests chair bangs horizontal. Have you ever heard Robin talk that much? I thought the kid was like mute.
        So, guess hes not.
        But Im pretty sure half of that dream was from Peter Pan or something. Or like, Shakespeare. Why does he talk like that?
        Who? Just Vienna it, Corker says. She love smommying him. Probs knows-
        A sudden bang! topples West out of his chair and the Sphere out of Corkers hands.
        The heck!
        I am a sick man, and all the sudden Robin himself slithers out of the air duct directly above them. I think my liver hurts. He gangle-limbs across pipes and tubes down to them as West scrambles back into his seat.
        Oh my GOD, Robin!
        Time is like the dimensions of space, Robin replies, boasting a grin like West has never seen on him. He lies down on the old rug and SNUGGLES.
        Yes, Robin. You are very fast. Corker pauses. And bendy. are you sick?
        In the head, West mutters sullenly.
        I have made an important decision today. He puffs out his pathetic little ribcage, hand on hips: Coca-Cola. Enjoy.
        Um. You want a Coke?
        Robin worms his way between Corker and the console and presses his hands to Corkers face, shaking the pilots head side to side. No Robin, no Robin. Then he poked himself in the sternum. Robin Coca-Cola.
        Corker looks up at West, cheeks squashed. What?
        Hes rebranding himself, West says. Alright. Coca-Cola. Great. Now scramble. He detaches Robin from the front of his pilot. We have important ship-flying business.
        Robin grabs Wests arm and half climbs him to breathe fervently into his ear: Who would ever think that so much went on in the soul of a young girl?
        Augh! West jerks back, Robin drops to the deck, giggling. Okay, okay. So youre Robin Coca-Cola and youre a girl now.
        The kid launches up, nose elevated like a snotty teenaged girl. People never notice anything. And then he sashays out of the bridge.
        That was funny. Corker says, picking up his Sphere.
        That was from Catcher in the Rye, West says, offended. He jabs at a big red button. Vienna. Get in here.
 

Viking Old Rugs

 
05-21-2011  |  By: Erica and Katy |  (0) Post comment »  |  Read comments »
 
Viking Old Rugs
There are about a million kinds of animal artwork from the ancient Vikings. All of ther ancient rugs and tapestries featued ribbon-like animals. Eric the Red colonized Greenland (well, really he tricked people into going to Greenland by calling it Greenland becuase there was no more room on Iceland). His son Leif Erickson discovered Vinland, aka present-day America. These men brought tons of cultural and artistic innovations to all of the places they colonized (read: pillaged) including old rugs and other clothwork.
Vikings are what scientists called "awesome", although they didn't actually have horns on their helmets. Too impractical.
Two Olafs in Norway and Denmark, basically the kings of the land, decided to go Christian long after these colonizations. They were baptized and spread the word of Christianity around the end of the tenth century.
 Viking life was pretty chill. They tended to have some animal husbandry and fishing, those were their main exports. They had a lot of leaders. They would go out and become like sea kings and build up their prestige by being pirates. THe work viking basically means pirates. THey would come back with their treasures and their followers and declare themselves King. Later on, especially in Denmark there was a more cohesive ruling class .Later on, Queen Margaret, united scandinavia. She was the daughter of the king of Norway and then she married next in line to the trhone of Denmark, and then her son was basically in a position to be king of both Denmark and Norway. But then in Sweden there were rebellions, and they had a Garman king on the throne. He was going to be deposed. Margaret's son died, and since seh was regent, she became Queen. She used some political manipulations to put herself as the new Queen. She got a rich Earl in Sweden to help her, and she was able to depose the German king and rule over Sweden.
 

Antique Rug Placement

 
05-18-2011  |  By: Azaad |  (0) Post comment »  |  Read comments »
 
Antique Rug Placement
Some people feel they would like to invest in an antique rug but are not sure what they should do with it once they have it- there is in fact a lot of strategy to do with where and how you place a Persian rug within the home and within a room.

    For example, how old and what condition the rug is in can play a role. If you've purchased a more delicate, fine Persian rug, you'll probably want to avoid placing it in an area with heavy foot traffic, like right in the entryway to your home or in the hallway. On the other hand, heavier, more sturdy rugs are perfect to make a big statement right as you walk into the house.  Check to see what kind of dyes were used in the production of the rug- vegetable-based dyes tend to do very well at resisting damage. ALso check the materials- a wool rug will obviously survive much better than silk. Keep in mind the main color involved- it's pretty self-explanatory, but it's easy to forget how easily a white or pale rug gets dirty.

Another important thing to think about is how the color goes with the rest of the room. You don't necessarily need to literally match colors, red for red, brown for brown.  And often times an intricate pattern of separate colors, at a distance, can look like a totally different colors. And many rugs will have a little bit of, like, fifteen colors in them, so it's more of the overall impression a tug makes that needs to go well with the room. Especially if you have more 'modern' furniture, you may want to think about getting a different kind of area rug.

And your rug doesn't necessarily have to go in the living room or entryway, either- kitchens and even bathrooms can work. If you have small children, though, it's not recommended- they spill a lot in kitchens and tend to be less neat in bathroom, which can lead to staining and ruining a tug.  Any rug you place in front of, say, the kitchen sink, should be a good, thick hardy wool rug that won't slip too much and can withstand a lot of wear and tear.
 

 
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